Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2020, Page: 30-39
Crop Production System and Their Constraints in East Shewa Zone, Oromia National Regional State, Ethiopia
Asfaw Negesse Senbeta, Departments of Agricultural Economics, Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Centre, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Ethiopia
Shimalis Gizachew Daselegn, Departments of Agricultural Economics, Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Centre, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Ethiopia
Yassin Esmael Ahmed, Departments of Agricultural Economics, Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Centre, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Ethiopia
Beriso Bati Bukul, Departments of Agricultural Economics, Adami Tulu Agricultural Research Centre, Oromia Agricultural Research Institute, Ethiopia
Received: Oct. 16, 2019;       Accepted: Apr. 15, 2020;       Published: Apr. 30, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijees.20200502.11      View  281      Downloads  92
Abstract
Crop production is a complex combination of inputs which influenced by environmental, economical, institutional, political and social factors. Targeted extension for heterogeneous farming systems is a challenge in developing countries. Crop production characterization based on agro-ecology, production system and different farm components helps to identify area specific problems and give proper technological intervention to address the problems. Therefore, this study was initiated to characterize cropping system in East Shewa Zone with the objectives of identifying and characterizing the existing cropping systems, identify and prioritize constraints of crop production for identifying potential research interventions. Both Primary and secondary data collection method was used. Multi-stage sampling technique was employed to select sampled districts, PAs and household farmers. Primary data was collected by conducting Focus Group Discussion (FGD), key informant interview and household’s interview by using semi-structured questionnaires. A total of 184 sample households were interviewed. Descriptive statistics was used to analyze the collected data using STATA version 14. The study finds out that East Shewa Zone practices rain feed and irrigation based cropping systems. Irrigation based crop production system that dominated by onion-tomato based production system and rain-fed based farming system which classified into maize-Teff based and haricot bean-chickpea based production systems. Major agricultural production constraints within the crop production systems of Zone are identified and the possible policy implications are suggested to solve the identified problems.
Keywords
Constraints, East Shewa Zone, Crop Production System, Identification and Characterization
To cite this article
Asfaw Negesse Senbeta, Shimalis Gizachew Daselegn, Yassin Esmael Ahmed, Beriso Bati Bukul, Crop Production System and Their Constraints in East Shewa Zone, Oromia National Regional State, Ethiopia, International Journal of Energy and Environmental Science. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 30-39. doi: 10.11648/j.ijees.20200502.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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